INTERVIEW: MOLLY RÄNGE OF LUNCH BEAT

Life takes us through certain paths that develop into memorable journeys. Those journeys become unforgettable experiences.  Experiences that make our hearts beat faster, those we learn to talk about and share. Moments we’d like everyone we know to be a part of.  Molly Ränge, founder of Lunch Beat kindly shares her moments with us. Those that formed her and guided her towards the successful projects she carries out today.

What would you say your current job title is?

Concept developer and process designer. Basically I construct the frame work for where others can develop or work in.

You’ve worked on many interesting projects, could you tell us about one of your favorite projects?

I studied project management at the university of Malmo. Once I finished my studies I got a job at the university. I thought a few classes in Event Production, Project Management and Cultural Policies. Event Production course was very practical and had about 20 students. During the course,their task was to arrange a club night at a venue which held about 800 people they were responsible for all aspects and had only one month to produce. It was actually one of my best memories in relation to work. The event was extremely successful, there were 800+ guests and the students were extremely happy with their accomplishments. And I, consequentially happy for them. That was something that helped me realize what kinds of roles I like to take.

Could you tell us a bit about what the Lunchbeat concept is and how it started?

It started with my love for dancing and my love for work. I love work but find it very frustrating to go out at night, and if I go out at night I find it very frustrating to go to work in the morning. So what if we could have the club at lunch time? and by having that, it could  help me with motivation through out the rest of my day. A win win situation!

The first lunch beat was in June 2010, in the car garage at my job.  We had the keys to the garage and we had a boom box. So we sent out some invitations.  Our first club had 14 people.

If you could have any DJ or musician play at Lunch Beat who would it be?

On an international level I would love to have Busy P playing at Lunchbeat. If I should go more local or into the not-yet-super-famous-but-should-be genre, I had my best dance experiences to Mattias Almlund (aka. Tiaz) sets in Malmö.

Where else could you see the Lunch Beat concept working as successfully as here

in Stockholm?

It has to be cities that have a concentrated “lunch area” and cities that have a lunch gap in common. They’ve done it in Malmö where the business area and lunch areas are quite spread out, so the impact was lesser than the one we had here in Stockholm.

With experience in the electronic music scene could you give us your take on the overall Swedish Music scene today?

I’ve actually reached a stage where I get really bored when I enter unwelcoming clubs. Those clubs that live strong on having an attitude. I’ve acquired a different experience from clubbing abroad. When you are used to everyone embracing you, and you’re at clubs that are build solely on happiness and dancing. I would like to have that here in Stockholm.

However, I love the live acts here in Sweden. Sweden is very welcoming to live acts for example acts like Little Dragon, This is Head, and Wildbirds and Peacedrums. That scene is a much better scene than the club scene.

What changes could you make to Sweden’s music scene?

Something I would like to see more of here is musical experiences presented in a way where they can be enjoyed by larger groups and different situations. Rather than always at a concert.

What are the next steps for The Lunch Beat?

Well, for me the next thing is to try to build Lunch Beat as a self structured organization that would let me step back and let it run on its own. As of now, I’ve received a lot of attention about being the one “behind” Lunch Beat but I can get a bit uncomfortable with the attention. Because as I said before my ambition is to work kinda “behind the scenes” creating a framework for others to create and build. And I would love to see that someone else would try it out in Stockholm.  I would like it to became something like the flash mob trend, where people wouldn’t have to ask me for permission to do it

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